McMurdo’s Camp

-S&D in A Study in Scarlet

S&D in STUD

Watson encountered Stamford in the Criterion Bar.  No mention of drink there.  Then they went to lunch at the Holborn, where during lunch, Young Stamford looked rather strangely at Watson over his wineglass.  No mention of what was being drunk.

Holmes & Watson discussed their smoking habits of choice during their first meeting at Bart’s.

At the Brixton Road crime scene, Holmes gathered up very carefully a little pile of gray dust from the floor, and packed it away in an envelope.  It was cigar ashes, from which Holmes determined the killer had smoked a Trichinopoly cigar.

Gregson came and told Holmes he had arrested Arthur Charpentier, sub-lieutenant in Her Majesty’s navy. At Holmes’ invitation, he had a cigar with some whisky and water. He puffed complacently. Later, he spilled his drink when he found out Stangerson had been murdered.

While Holmes was out following the “old crone” who came to pick up the ring, Watson sat stolidly puffing at his pipe and skipping over the pages of Henri Murger’s Vie de Boheme.

While on patrol John Rance pondered how uncommon handy a four of gin hot would be.  No record if he actually had any to drink.

Neither of the subject vices was practiced in The Country of the Saints. (That’s Mormons for you.)

Enoch Drebber, on the very night of his arrival at Mme. Charpentier’s, became very much the worse for drink, and, indeed, after twelve o’clock in the day he could hardly ever be said to be sober. He drank often.

Back in London and trailed by Jefferson Hope, Drebber walked down the road and went into one or two liquor shops, staying for nearly half an hour in the last of them. When he came out, he staggered in his walk, and was evidently pretty well on. Then, in Hope’s cab, the craze for drink seized him again, and he ordered Hope to pull up outside a gin palace. He went in, and there he remained until closing time. After the ride, he got what was coming to him.

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